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22 October 2014

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Hi, Corey!

How I love stories about sweet Annie! I love how you often forage things and she vets them for you!!! She's also teaching you a rare art--how lucky!! She's a true treasure!!

I've never had blackthorn. Based on your description, I'm not sure I need to ever try it!!

Warm regards,
Tara
Ambler, PA, USA

Oh Corey what a find!! Have you ever heard of Sloe Gin? Even if you hate Gin this fruit transforms it into something quite delicious. I don't know the exact quantities but you need a bottle of Gin and Sloes (the blackthorn fruit)pricked with a needle and put in the bottle with sugar. Leave in a dark cool place for a year and it is transformed into a most delicious tipple. Give it a try you will be amazed!!!

I'm glad the blackthorn made Annie happy.

Very interesting! Looked up Blackthorn on Wikipedia, where I learned that its Latin name is Prunus_spinosa (spiny plum). Those are some mean-looking thorns! Don't recall the plant from Northern California, nor did Farmboy Husband from the Midwest, however. Presumably Blackthorn berries have a high nutritional (and anti-oxidant) level -- that Annie certainly eats nutritiously!

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prunus_spinosa

It looks like it might make good jam...I think that dog just wanted to greet you and give you a smile.

Corey, off topic but for your 8k download the run keeper app and it is a great motivator for training for a 10k. The free one was enough for me but it really worked for me. I think it's wonderful Chelsea signed you up. I'm recovering from tendionitis as I really got into the run/walk mode and overdid it I guess. I miss it. My daughter signed our family up for the 5k turkey trot so hope to be in shape for thanksgiving.

Corey, there must be some history behind your being afraid that an approaching dog will eat you alive, and for whatever that history is, I am sorry. I am even sorrier that at this time in your life, when you try to be open to joy, you are missing out on one of life's great joys if that level of fear is your reaction when a dog starts coming toward you.

We know those as Sloes. Pick them after the first frost. Bottle them with one third Sloe, to one third sugar and fill up with Gin - although I use less sugar myself. Turn the bottle gently every day until all the sugar has dissolved and then strain out the sloes. Delicious and very good for keeping cold winter evenings at bay!

So funny I'd be more afraid of the berry than the dog. I do love Annie stories. You two have a relationship I can only dream of. I miss my Mother and my Grand.

Does your mother read your blog? If I picked an unknown berry and ate it my mother, who is no longer alive, would skin me alive. Glad it was a "good" berry. Good old Annie!

Beautiful post today Corey.Always beautiful.

Blackthorn is such an ominous name. Perfect for Halloween time. Thanks everyone for the tips about it.
Last month I was walking my little dog and ahead, unleashed, sat a huge German Shepherd in a driveway. He headed our way at a trot. My sixth sense told me to keep walking and when he got closer I said "Go Home". He stopped in his tracks, turned around and went home. My stomach settled back where it belonged. That was a well trained dog, and Rudy and I were very lucky.

blackthorn never heard of it before + adore that I learned something today + love the annie story. xxpeggybraswelldesign.com

I loved hearing about Annie going through your finds, I could just envision it...give her a hug for me!

I submitted a question re Blackthorn to the Washington Post's British-born gardening columnist Adrian Higgins yesterday, who replied as follows (which probably explains why I've never seen Blackthorn in the Mid-Atlantic states):
live.washingtonpost.com/gardening-1023.html

"This is a stalwart of the English hedgerows of my youth, and folks can be found harvesting the sloes now and after frost. I think our climate is way too hot and humid for this prunus to remain healthy here."

I submitted a question re Blackthorn to the Washington Post's British-born gardening columnist Adrian Higgins yesterday, who replied as follows (which probably explains why I've never seen Blackthorn in the Mid-Atlantic states):

"This is a stalwart of the English hedgerows of my youth, and folks can be found harvesting the sloes now and after frost. I think our climate is way too hot and humid for this prunus to remain healthy here."

I love your prayer......I am stealing it ...."Shit God....yes, from now on, I will begin my prayers this way..

I have never had Blackthorn, but so glad you were able to
pick for Annie and that she enjoyed. How lovely to bring her treasures to inspire stories.

I have dogs, have since birth but let me say that it is not unusual to be afraid of strange dogs coming at you...once I was attacked by a friend's doberman, luckily I had narrowly escaped and it only got my boot as I fell through the door onto the floor. Another time we were on our honeymoon and walking thru a deserted old town when a pack of dogs came barking and charging at us from nowhere...I screamed but my husband turned and roared loudly at them, they turned and ran. And, one of my own big dogs was attacked & nearly died in our walled yard by a neighbor's pit bull that somehow jumped/climbed over. So don't feel foolish about being scared...heck, just a few months ago another neighbor's dog came charging at me and my dog on a walk around the block! Believe me there are many dogs being used as guard dogs more and more these days...and, no I don't take walks anymore unless I have a BIG STICK. I love dogs ALOT but they can be very dangerous & there are many stories on the NEWS about children & even adults being killed by somebody's pet dog! Also, please be careful about eating wild berries unless you definitely know...another sad story in our NEWS was about some adopted kids eating berries off their new families backyard bushes & not knowing.

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